The Voice for Insightful Leadership with Shelley Row, P.E.

Your Search for insightful leader

Insightful Leadership with Shelley Row, P.E., CSP

…seeing beyond the data

It was a beautiful fall day in Keystone, Colorado. The aspen were gold and the sun highlighted the crevasses in the mountains that guarded the lake. It was a perfect time to rent a kayak and paddle around under the blue sky. My love affair with Kayaking really began after trying one of the Lake Sunapee rentals last year due to being convinced by a close friend to give it a try. My friend is an experienced kayaker, the sort of person who has all of the equipment and regularly goes kayaking. Using a trailer to take all of this gear around with you can be difficult to find apparently, that’s why finding yourself a good trailer that has room for everything is so important. Looking at reviews, such as https://bestkayaks.reviews/best-kayak-trailers-reviews for example, before purchasing your trailer is always a good option to see what other people think. However, I am not experienced in kayaking. But…how hard can it be? It’s a kayak. I mean, if you’re not experienced like me, maybe you should read some kayaking tips on campingfunzone.com to prepare yourself. Even if it is ‘just a kayak’, there’s got to be some level of skill to it!

Truthfully, it wasn’t hard to paddle around. You need the proper kayak (like those you can go now and see online), and a little training to get that right, but it isn’t tricky to learn. It was just difficult to get to a specific point on the lake – just as it can be difficult to reach the goal that you set in your organization. Here are three points gleaned from paddling on a Colorado lake that can help you reach your organizational goals.

  1. Set a clear goal. “Let’s paddle to that grove of trees on the point,” my friend said. I replied, “Which grove of trees on which point?” It took discussion and lots of pointing to clarify which grove of trees on which point of land. It’s the same in your organization. The goal may seem crystal clear to you. It’s unlikely to be that clear to others. Talk about the goal with your staff and team. Engage them in discussion. What behavior will you all see when the goal is achieved? What specific outcome will be realized and how will you know? This is the only way to ensure that everyone is working toward the same end.
  2. Adjust constantly. Off we went toward our grove of trees. But it wasn’t that easy. We negotiated how we would paddle together without knocking each other’s paddle. Plus, the light breeze blew the kayak away from the point of land. We were constantly compensating for the breeze and an occasional boat wake. Similarly, how will your team work together and not get in each other’s way? It’s not that easy. Personality conflicts, incomplete communication and busy schedules get in the way of coordinated work. I’ve seen it first hand in my organization and in those organizations with whom I work. Busy staff don’t talk to co-workers – even briefly – to discover that they are doing the same work or that they are working at cross-purposes. It takes constant communication to make course corrections. In my office, each project had a detailed road map to guide the work. Even with the road map, it was essential that we read the “breeze” in the organization and adjust. As your work progresses, what do you know today that you didn’t know when you started? What course corrections are called for? Become an observer of the staff and their communication styles. Who is working well together and who continues to paddle at cross-purposes? An adjustment in staff roles can better align natural communication styles for more productive work.
  3. Anticipate. As we paddled, it looked like we were on track – heading straight for the point – but with one extra paddle stroke, we’d gone too far. I didn’t anticipate the momentum of the kayak and adjust my paddling in time. It took more time and effort to reach the point. Are you reading the situation and anticipating the next steps? Every office has momentum – work flows that are set in motion, processes that are half completed. You must anticipate where the momentum takes you and adjust in advance before the need is obvious. This is the work of the insightful leader. Are you a keen observer of the work flow, the patterns in the office and the external influences? It’s only then that you can anticipate the trajectory and course correct before others realize it’s needed.

We made it to the point – eventually. I learned that I have a lot to learn about kayaking. On the surface, it looks easy, but the art of kayaking takes skill and intentional thought. Providing wise leadership is the same. Data isn’t enough. You must be an astute observer of the people and work to stay on course.

Copyright: wavebreakmediamicro / 123RF Stock Photo



Best Audience: Corporate events, Annual meetings, Associations, Conferences

insightful decision making - shelley row insightful leadership keynotes & workshops

This fast-paced, interactive, thought-provoking and content rich keynote will provide your managers with valuable insights to instantly improve their decision-making approach and everyday interactions with their staff.

Shelley, a subject matter expert and former CEO level government and association executive, interviewed 77 highly acclaimed executives on their decision-making skills regarding intuition and how those results are integrated with neuroscience.  As a result, the participants will enhance their current skill set and receive proven tips, tools and solutions to improve their decisions.

This real-world program is relevant to leaders who face complex decisions in a disruptive, chaotic and complex world. In this fast-paced and changing environment, data alone isn’t enough. Insightful leaders need a sophisticated approach that skillfully balances hardline analytics and gut feel or, stated differently, integrates information and intuition for astute action. This powerful combination is Infotuition®.

If your organization wants to grow the bottom line through enhanced decision making and reduced workplace drama, then this program with its accompanying mini-book workbook is for you.

Learning objectives:

  • Limit and stop over-thinking by resolving the forces that freeze decision-making.
  • Discover proven techniques to slow a quick reaction before you respond and regret it.
  • Enable “aha!” moments when you need them the most.

 


Workshop

Best Audience: Conference workshop, corporate workshop for mid to upper-level managers, association workshop for staff, boards, or chapter leaders

insightful decision making - shelley row insightful leadership go with your gut keynotes & workshopsThis in-depth, interactive, and thought-provoking workshop gives your managers the opportunity to probe the effectiveness of their decision-making whether it is too slow or too reactive. Applying insights from neuroscience, this interactive and engaging workshop brings new skills to even the most experienced manager.

This real-world program is relevant to leaders who face complex decisions in a disruptive, chaotic and complex world. In this fast-paced and changing environment, data alone isn’t enough. Insightful leaders need a sophisticated approach that skillfully balances hardline analytics and gut feel or, stated differently, integrates information and intuition for astute action. This powerful combination is Infotuition®.

 

If your organization wants to enhance decision making, reduce workplace drama and improve productivity, then this program with its accompanying mini-book workbook, is for you.

Your managers will be talking about this impactful program for days and weeks to come. They will:

  • Limit and stop over-thinking by resolving the forces that freeze decision-making.
  • Discover proven techniques to slow a quick reaction before they respond and regret it.
  • Recognize and manage triggered behavior in staff and colleagues.
  • Enable “aha!” moments when they need them the most.

 

Remember back in early March, when every single decision and idea we had was met with fear and doubt, because none of us knew for certain what to expect, or how bad things were going to get? Now, after several months of settling in to so many “new normals,” perhaps it’s time to reflect on what we learned and give consideration to what strategies worked best for us in the face of adversity.

I’m fortunate enough to have spent a lot of time on the water.  While COVID-19 may have been my first time ever in a pandemic, it was not the first time I’ve been tossed around by a violent storm and lived to tell about it – I mean this figuratively and literally. The good news is, bad storms can give us perspective. They help us to see what really matters and they force us to make better decisions. Here are four important things I learned…

It was supposed to be an easy cruise. That’s what they told me.  The  47’ Morris sailboat, sailed the Newport to Bermuda race and finished second in her class. We were part of the crew sailing her back to Newport.  And, it was my first sailing trip. To say that the trip didn’t go as planned is an understatement if there ever was one. We made it back safe and sound because of the quality of the boat and the experience of the crew – except for me. When we left I still didn’t know a jib from a halyard or port from starboard.

The trip, expected to be a little more than three days, took five due to adverse weather. The only thing calm was the crew. The seas were rough almost from the start and became even rougher when we crossed the Gulf Stream. The evening we hit the Gulf Stream, we encountered three 50-knot squalls in quick succession with 10’ to 12’ seas. Due to the rough weather, the boat had a series of issues. The auto pilot stopped working on day one, the engine stopped on day two, during the storm the reef line on the mainsail broke, the halyard on the jib broke, the furler jammed, the tack of the spinnaker let go and, later, the spinnaker artfully wrapped itself around the forestay. During the worst of the storm, lines fell into the water and promptly wound themselves around the propeller shaft. I’m told that none of this is unusual but to have them all happen on one voyage was remarkable. By the time we arrived in Newport, everything I brought to wear was wet. The quick-dry fabric never dried.  Collectively, we smelled like a 50’ wet tennis shoe. Are we having fun yet?

As I lay in the narrow bunk, heeled 30 degrees, I listening to the storm tear at the boat and sails. And, I listened to the crew tackle each adversity calmly, collaboratively, decisively and transparently. Do you do the same when adversity hits your organization?

Calm. It was one problem after another in quick succession in rough weather. It would have been unnerving except for the calm of the captain. With each calamity, he talked to the crew – no raised voice, panic, or exasperation. The intensity of the situation stood in clear contrast to his calm demeanor.  As an insightful leader, how do you manage stress and outwardly demonstrate calm?

Collaborate. When a problem was solved, something else broke. Each time, the captain collaborated with the crew. What happened? What are the pros/cons of each option? This was no dictatorship. Neither was it a democracy. It was informed leadership. How do you collaborate under stress to capture and objectively weigh all options? Our captain based his decisions on crew input. Do you truly listen to others?

Decisive. The conversations between the captain and crew were quick, succinct and decisive. The captain listened, made a decision, and that was that. Other ideas were dropped, and action was taken. Are your decisions crisp, clear and strong? Once you decide, don’t waiver. There’s time later to evaluate and adjust. For now, give staff clear directions to follow.

Transparent. We were in a tough spot. Some of us were not experienced sailors and the situation was a wee bit unnerving (to say the least). It would have been easy for the captain to sugar-coat our predicament under the pretense of not alarming us.  Instead, he was honest and transparent. In a matter-of-fact manner, he shared the realities of each situation and decision. The transparency was reassuring and created trust. Are you being transparent with your staff about difficult situations? Yes, some topics can’t be discussed openly, and it is not constructive to publicly debate every option.  However, once a decision is made, it is helpful to share the decision, the rationale behind the decision and the implications. People understand that not everything goes as expected, but people don’t like to be in the dark. That creates suspicion and erodes trust. Transparency does the opposite.

I confess that I’m not ready for another cruise like this one, but I’m grateful for the crew and for the lessons: be calm, collaborate, be decisive and transparent.

Have you been able to weather the storms that hit you both professionally and personally, this year? What about your finances or your relationships? The good news is, bad storms can give us perspective. They help us to see what really matters and they force us to make better decisions.

Next time you’re dealing with the raging winds and powerful waves of the storms surrounding your business or your personal life, keep these four anchors in mind!

Whether your technical expertise is in engineering (like mine), law, finance, technology or science, we technical folks don’t have good reputations as managers.  When a technically accomplished person is promoted into management, suddenly the old skills that made us successful are not as relevant. 

I’ve seen technically talented managers become perplexed by people issues, stymied by office politics and mystified by seemingly illogical decisions made by “management”. You don’t have to be perplexed, stymied or mystified. Here are the top ten skills that I learned the hard way when I became a manager. Now, you can eliminate the frustration by learning from my mistakes so that your management competence matches your technical competence.  

  1. Know your staff. Take the time to get to know each of your staff individually. 
  • What’s their background? 
  • What are they passionate about in their work and life?  
  • What are the skills that they love to use? 
  • What type of work makes them feel fulfilled? 
  • What is something that you have in common? 
  • What do they need from you to be successful? 

     2. Know your skills and preferences. If you haven’t already, now is the time to become self-aware. You need to see yourself clearly and honestly. 

  • What are your strengths – those behaviors that you do so easily that you didn’t realize it was special?
  • How do those characteristics support you at work? When do you overdo them at work? 
  • What are your communication style preferences? How do you respond to those who communicate similarly to you? How do you respond to those who communicate differently from you? 
  • What are the stories in your life that color your perceptions? 
  • What are the filters through which you see the world? 
  • How do you prefer to work? When will you have that in your management role and when will you not? 
  • What people and situations trigger you and why? 
  • Are you coachable? 

      3. Know your boss. You need to know the motivations, stresses, and strains that your boss is under. 

  • What makes your boss tick? What does she care about? 
  • What’s his career and personal background? 
  • What’s his pet project? 
  • What frustrates her? 
  • What is his biggest time waster? 
  • What keeps her up at night? How can you help alleviate some of that stress?

     4. Know the influencers. Regardless of position, there are people inside and outside the organization who count.

  • Who are the power players who wield influence? Whose opinion carries weight in the office and with your boss?
  • What can you learn about their background, interests, headaches, and passions?
  • Who are the deep thinkers who everyone respects? What do they think? What are they worried about?
  • Where is an area of commonality that allows you to connect with them?
  • How can they become your ally?

5. Know the factors other than the data that are influencing organizational trajectory. Organizations are impacted by factors that can’t be measured.

  • Are there political factors that will impact your organization? If so, what are they? 
  • What are the societal trends that you should attend to? Global trends? 
  • Are there relationships outside the organization that impact its success? 
  • What can you do regularly to remain attentive to these forces?

6. Know the person who can get things done in the office. There is someone in the office who is a skilled networker and sleuth.  She knows everyone! This person has informal power and knows where the bodies are buried. Everyone probably owes him a favor. She will know about birthdays, anniversaries, family illnesses, staff worries, hopes and fears.  Because of these connections, he will have an uncanny way of getting things done. 

  • Who is it? Find out and make friends.

7. Know a broad range of information sources. We all have a natural inclination to seek information from sources that are comfortable and familiar. 

  • Where are you getting your information? Is it from people you know and trust? The people who are like you? 
  • Are you reaching outside your comfortable circle to those with different backgrounds and demographics? 
  • Are you seeking input from the people who make you uncomfortable or who are likely to disagree? 
  • Do you need to expand to a bigger reach?

8. Know how to challenge your initial impressions. It is easy to make and hold initial impressions but there is usually more to the story than that. Our mental shortcuts – the impressions we form – can be heavily influenced by biases of all sorts. 

  • What immediate impressions have you formed about the people on your staff and the people you will work with? Now, challenge those impressions. 
  • Ask yourself why you immediately like some people but not others. Why are you impressed or not? You will likely discover that you naturally connect with people who are like you in some way such as a common background, work style, or value systems 
  • Are you listening more to them and discounting input from those with whom you don’t naturally connect? 
  • Are you allowing this human tendency to skew your perceptions and decisions? 
  • How can you challenge yourself to look beyond initial impressions of people? 

9. Know your vision for the organization. As a leader and manager, you need a vision that charts a clear course for your organization. This creates confidence and certainty for the staff. 

  • Do you have enough information to have a vision? 
  • What are the trends? 
  • What data can you collect? 
  • What is your initial impression of the data? Now, what are the different interpretations of the same data? 
  • What other intangible factors need to be considered? 
  • Combine the data with the intangibles. What’s the trajectory for the organization and the factors you need to watch?

10. Know your leadership philosophy. Like having a vision for the organization, your leadership philosophy guides decisions about the investment of time, money and creation of the office culture. You need clarity about your leadership beliefs.

  • What do you believe about leadership and do you behave in accordance with your belief? 
  • Do you believe in transparency? 
  • Are you willing to allow others to see that you don’t know everything? 
  • Do you trust your staff? Do they trust you? 
  • How much control are you willing to relinquish? 
  • How much do you believe in coaching and staff development? Do you believe in staff development enough to invest time and money? 
  • How do you invest in your leadership growth?

If you found this helpful, there is a ten-part, interactive webinar series based on these skills. Click here for more information and to register. Or, email kerry@shelleyrow.com for details. 

Contact Shelley Row at the Insightful Leadership Institute to assist you and your staff to grow your skills as an insightful leader.

 

Insightful Leadership Institute Seeks a Dynamic Social Media and Website Manager

Job Description: Part Time (for now) Social Media and Website Manager

A fast-growing, woman-owned business seeks a goal-focused and creative Social Media and Website Manager who gets things done and who wants to contribute to having an impact on others through the Insightful Leadership Institute (ILI). The goal for the Social Media and Website Manager is to develop and execute a social media, newsletter and website strategy to grow the reach and message of the ILI. Responsibilities In collaboration with the founder, Shelley Row,and the ILI Business Manager this person will be responsible for developing and executing a social media, SEO, newsletter and website strategy to expand the message and enhance the positioning of the ILI brand.

The Social Media and Website Manager will develop coordinated messages and keywords to be used across all social media, newsletter and website platforms. The successful candidate will have skills in virtual marketing and search engine optimization (SEO) and will apply those skills to creatively develop, design and implement messages across LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube and Facebook as a minimum for an intentional social media strategy.

The candidate will also be responsible for creating and implementing a newsletter platform that expands the impact of the ILI to targeted audiences. The candidate will manage contact lists through MailChimp and KarmaCRM and leverage the lists for use in marketing ILI products and services. The Social Media and Website manager will also have responsibility for leveraging and updating the ILI website for consistent messaging and SEO.

The candidate will post blogs with targeted links and keywords and implement payment platforms via the website. The candidate will also provide routine website maintenance and updates to ensure efficient loading, security and constant availability.The Social Media and Website manager will work with the Business Manager to use social media, the newsletter and website to launch new programs (such as online programs, webinars, podcasts, speaking events) and ensure clear consistent messaging across all platforms.

Skills and Attributes

The candidate should have the following skills:

•Application of social media platforms (specifically LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and Twitter),

•Design of social media graphics,

•Creating and launching newsletters,•Basic video editing (for YouTube),

•Managing contact lists via MailChimp and Karma to support marketing goals,•Use of Karma (or similar CRM platform) for lead tracking and follow-up,

•Creating auto-marketing responders for consistent follow up with client leads,

•Skill in WordPress for website updates and routine maintenance (website design and extensive maintenance work would be done through other contracts as necessary),

•Proficiency in Microsoft office products such as Word, Excel and PowerPoint,

•Graphic design fundamentals.

This position is for you if…

You want to bean active collaborator in a dynamic environment that gives you the creative freedom to apply your skills to reach goals. In addition to being an exciting opportunity with tremendous growth potential, this position allows you to learn from Shelley’s leadership experience, participate first-hand in growing an entrepreneurial business that makes a difference in the world and allows you to participate in a dynamic business from the inside out.

Work Environment

The position starts at 20 hours per week and is likely to grow. During the trial period of three months, the Social Media and Website Manager will be an hourly contractor. Once we determine that there is a mutually beneficial fit, the position becomes an employee with a salary. The Social Media and Website Manager may work remotely much of the time but should plan to be in the ILI offices in Annapolis, MD a couple days per week when Shelley is in town.

The Insightful Leadership Institute was founded by Shelley Row, PE, CSP and is based in Annapolis, MD. Trained as an engineer, Shelley is passionate about helping technical professionals transform their technical skills into management and communication skills. These are skills that Shelley had to learn to become a senior executive in the federal government. Today, she is a sought-after speaker and trainer. And she consults for leadership development particularly to technical companies. To learn more about the ILI, see our website at www.shelleyrow.com.Interested candidates should send a cover letter, resume, references and relevant work examples to shelley@shelleyrow.com.

Hard-to-work-with, passive-aggressive, disagreeable, arrogant, unresponsive, unmotivated, angry. Know anyone like that?

Rational, levelheaded, thoughtful, curious, respectful, friendly, easy-to-get-along-with, agreeable. You probably know people like this, too.

Whether negative or positive, we throw labels onto people until they stick. Those labels are a product of our judgement and are heavily influenced by our biases and filters. Without awareness of the potential for bias, you can under or over-estimate a person’s skills, discount their input, fail to take advantage of their knowledge or only hear ideas from those with whom you agree. All of this artificially narrows your viewpoint, restricts options and skews your decisions. On the other hand, an insightful leader knows to recognize his own biases and intentionally see beyond them. She knows to challenge her own limited viewpoints to intentionally gather the information that differs from her own opinion…and then listen to it.

For example, when I ran a research program for the federal government, we created active research programs of which I was proud. And then, we got a new boss. Within a few short discussions with him, I labeled him, “arrogant, difficult, and a jerk.” I’m sure he labeled me something like, “bureaucratic, wimpy, and weak.” Because I labeled him as “difficult,” I avoided talking to him, asking his opinion or working with him, as much as possible. He didn’t relish working with me either. In our meetings, he became frustrated and yelled his orders. My bias was so strong that projects he started, I discontinued when he left. Similarly, he disliked our programs and tried to stop the ongoing work. Sadly, neither he nor I could see beyond our biases to the value we each offered. The result – bad decision-making. He couldn’t the value in our projects and I couldn’t accept his good ideas (and he had good ideas). The big loser was the program of research that would have been stronger if we saw past our biases. To keep this from happening to you, you must first realize that, from a neuroscience perspective, the deck is stacked against you. You are designed to gravitate and believe those people you like.

You see, your brain takes shortcuts to make things easy for it. Those shortcuts create natural biases. It’s easier for your brain to talk to people for whom you feel a connection. Maybe they think like you, have a similar background, or you have something in common. Similarly, it’s easier for your brain to avoid those for whom you do not have an affinity. Perhaps they have different ideas, work processes, values or backgrounds.  Another brain shortcut is to unconsciously hear and give more credence to information that supports your existing viewpoint. When presented with a wide range of information, your brain will naturally gravitate to the information that is most like your existing perspective. Basically, it’s easy to see a situation as you always have but you must work harder to force your brain to be flexible to new ideas coming from different people.

You simply can’t afford to let your biases be in control of your decision-making and skew your perceptions. Here are five steps to challenge your existing impressions so that you create insightful decisions.

  1. Recognize the labels you’ve created. Recognize the labels that you have imposed onto others and that may hold back your receptivity to some people and overly rely on other people.
    • What impressions have you formed about the people you work with?
    • Who are your “good guys” and who are the “bad guys?”
  2. Challenge those impressions. Notice your natural preference for some and not others. Now, do the hard work of challenging your own impressions so that you create more balanced input.
    • Are you talking only to people with whom you’re comfortable?
    • Are you asking for input from those most likely to agree with you?
    • Are you avoiding those who rub you the wrong way?
    • Are you discounting (or not asking) opinions from those for whom you find tedious, annoying or difficult?
  3. Question your experience. Your brain easily gravitates to answers based on your experience. But, in a changing world, the past may not be prologue. Past experience may be of limited value.
    • Does the future resemble the past?
    • Do the old answers pertain to new questions?
    • Your experience may provide valuable input but are you sure?
    • Are you over-relying on experience from the past when the past may not be a reliable predictor of the future?
  4. Broaden your input. To change the impact of bias in your decision-making, intentionally identify a broad range of people from whom to seek input. Balance input from those likely to share your views with those likely to have a contrarian perspective. Talk to a range of people who are different from you. I once interviewed the head of the engineering department for a major university who was also a former astronaut. He explained that when faced with a difficult decision, he intentionally sought the opinions of women peers. Because, he noted, they approach problem-solving differently. He felt that he benefited from their shift in perspective. You can do the same if you intentionally challenge your biases.
    • Are you talking to a wide range of people including those with whom you easily relate and those you don’t?
    • Is the input you receive balanced between expected and surprising?
  5. Truly listen. Even when you make an effort to talk to a wide range of people, the natural inclination of your brain is to hear, remember and give more validity to opinions, facts and data that support your existing It takes more effort for your brain to internalize different perspectives.
    • Are you only hearing the input that supports your viewpoint?
    • Are you discounting the information that is contrary to your current beliefs?
    • Are you spending the extra time and energy to really listen and absorb other ideas?

How can you be more insightful about the impacts of your biases? What steps will you take to accommodate for your biases so that you make more robust decisions? Try these five steps to overcome your natural biases. You’ll take full advantage of many perspectives so that your viewpoint broads and you make more insightful decisions.

Share your stories about how you challenge your impressions and overcome biases with Shelley here.



Whether your technical expertise is in engineering (like mine), law, finance, technology or science, we technical folks don’t have good reputations as managers.  When a technically accomplished person is promoted into management, suddenly the old skills that made us successful are not as relevant. It’s a whole new ball game and a whole new set of skills. As we always said: Technical skills are the easy part. People skills are the hard part.

 

Technically-talented managers can become perplexed by people issues, stymied by office politics and mystified by seemingly illogical decisions made by “management”. You don’t have to be perplexed, stymied or mystified if you have all the information you need.

Here are 10 things that every technical person should know when they become a manager and leader.

  1. Know your staff
  2. Know you
  3. Know your boss
  4. Know the influencers
  5. Know the factors other than the data that are influencing organizational trajectory
  6. Know the person who can get things done in the office
  7. Know a broad range of information sources
  8. Know how to challenge your initial impressions
  9. Know your vision for the organization
  10. Know your leadership philosophy

To further develop your knowledge in these ten areas, click here, to receive questions to prompt your learning.

Contact Shelley Row to assist you and your staff to grow your skills as an insightful leader.



It was supposed to be an easy cruise. That’s what they told me.  The  47’ Morris sailboat, sailed the Newport to Bermuda race and finished second in her class. We were part of the crew sailing her back to Newport.  And, it was my first sailing trip. To say that the trip didn’t go as planned is an understatement if there ever was one. We made it back safe and sound because of the quality of the boat and the experience of the crew – except for me. When we left I still didn’t know a jib from a halyard or port from starboard.

The trip, expected to be a little more than three days, took five due to adverse weather. The only thing calm was the crew. The seas were rough almost from the start and became even rougher when we crossed the Gulf Stream. The evening we hit the Gulf Stream, we encountered three 50-knot squalls in quick succession with 10’ to 12’ seas. Due to the rough weather, the boat had a series of issues. The auto pilot stopped working on day one, the engine stopped on day two, during the storm the reef line on the mainsail broke, the halyard on the jib broke, the furler jammed, the tack of the spinnaker let go and, later, the spinnaker artfully wrapped itself around the forestay. During the worst of the storm, lines fell into the water and promptly wound themselves around the propeller shaft. I’m told that none of this is unusual but to have them all happen on one voyage was remarkable. By the time we arrived in Newport, everything I brought to wear was wet. The quick-dry fabric never dried.  Collectively, we smelled like a 50’ wet tennis shoe. Are we having fun yet?

As I lay in the narrow bunk, heeled 30 degrees, I listening to the storm tear at the boat and sails. And, I listened to the crew tackle each adversity calmly, collaboratively, decisively and transparently. Do you do the same when adversity hits your organization?GettyImages-87990433-590a5aae5f9b58647047e624

Calm. It was one problem after another in quick succession in rough weather. It would have been unnerving except for the calm of the captain. With each calamity, he talked to the crew – no raised voice, panic, or exasperation. The intensity of the situation stood in clear contrast to his calm demeanor.  As an insightful leader, how do you manage stress and outwardly demonstrate calm?

Collaborate. When a problem was solved, something else broke. Each time, the captain collaborated with the crew. What happened? What are the pros/cons of each option? This was no dictatorship. Neither was it a democracy. It was informed leadership. How do you collaborate under stress to capture and objectively weigh all options? Our captain based his decisions on crew input. Do you truly listen to others?

Decisive. The conversations between the captain and crew were quick, succinct and decisive. The captain listened, made a decision, and that was that. Other ideas were dropped, and action was taken. Are your decisions crisp, clear and strong? Once you decide, don’t waiver. There’s time later to evaluate and adjust. For now, give staff clear directions to follow.

Transparent. We were in a tough spot. Some of us were not experienced sailors and the situation was a wee bit unnerving (to say the least). It would have been easy for the captain to sugar-coat our predicament under the pretense of not alarming us.  Instead, he was honest and transparent. In a matter-of-fact manner, he shared the realities of each situation and decision. The transparency was reassuring and created trust. Are you being transparent with your staff about difficult situations? Yes, some topics can’t be discussed openly, and it is not constructive to publicly debate every option.  However, once a decision is made, it is helpful to share the decision, the rationale behind the decision and the implications. People understand that not everything goes as expected, but people don’t like to be in the dark. That creates suspicion and erodes trust. Transparency does the opposite.

I confess that I’m not ready for another cruise like this one, but I’m grateful for the crew and for the lessons: be calm, collaborate, be decisive and transparent.

Have you been hit by a storm? In life, in business, in a relationship?  What about in your finances, or in your relationships? Next time you’re dealing with the raging winds and powerful waves of the storms surrounding your business or your personal life, keep these four anchors in mind!



We were having dinner at a friend’s house and admiring his family memorabilia neatly arrayed in the bookshelves. There were the kid’s sailing trophies, family photos, delicate antique demitasse cups and a bright blue tube. A bright blue tube? “What’s that?” I asked. “Oh….it’s a kaleidoscope,” my friend replied. “Here, try it.” As I turned the tube, colors swirled and twirled. Each small movement altered the view and each view was as lovely as the other.

Why can’t we bring a kaleidoscopic view of the world into our workplace and into our leadership? When it comes to new perspectives, your brain works against you. It’s easier on the brain to see the world, to see a person or to see a decision as you’ve always seen it. But, with a little effort, other views – just as relevant – become visible. It’s as though you slightly turn the kaleidoscope.

Here are three areas where a kaleidoscopic world view is particularly valuable to your leadership and life.

See personnel situations from several perspectives – A disgruntled employee complains to you about his co-worker who they “just can’t work with,” and the list of grievances starts. In that moment, their argument sounds reasonable and valid. But, when you ‘turn the kaleidoscope’, you can likely see opportunities for misunderstanding, miscommunication and differing opinions. There are at least two sides to every story. It’s best to, first, seek out other perspectives; second, help the employee see beyond their singular view, and perhaps facilitate a conversation that highlights varied views of the situation.

See options for big decisions –When faced with a big decision, the brain prefers familiar solutions because, for the brain, the familiar is a short cut that feels effortless. However, big decisions benefit from a kaleidoscopic view. Here’s a technique that I discovered in a Harvard Business Review. As you debate a big decision and your team comes up with the expected approach, ask, “Let’s pretend that this option is not available to us. If not this approach, then what could we do?” This is a simple and effective way to force a shifted perspective. It’s as though you turn the kaleidoscope. Plus, you can use the same question repeatedly until you have a range of options upon which to base the decision.

See that it’s not always personal – Whether it’s with family, friends or co-workers, situations inevitably arise where feelings get hurt or questions arise in your mind. An offhand comment makes you feel peeved and you think, “That was an insensitive remark.” Or, maybe you’re left out of a meeting and you wonder, “Did they leave me out on purpose? Is the boss trying to tell me something?” In those moments, turn the kaleidoscope to see another perspective. In my experience, these situations are almost always explained away when viewed from a different viewpoint. Before letting your mind run away with your first interpretation, shift your outlook to find a different interpretation – one that doesn’t have you at the center.

Kaleidoscopes remind us that there’s always another way to see the world. Even a small rotation shifts the image, shifts the interpretation, and shifts the options. As an insightful leader, you must see a variety of views. And maybe you’ll discover that, like the kaleidoscope, each view is beautiful in its own way.