The Voice for Insightful Leadership with Shelley Row, P.E.

In case you haven’t noticed by now, an effective webinar isn’t simply a regular presence on a screen. Webinars should be designed differently…well if you want them to be impactful. Particularly now with everyone participating in webinars, yours can stand above the rest for its content, engagement, and memorability. Here’s a checklist to show you how to up your webinar game in a few easy steps.

The first big difference between a webinar and an in-person program, briefing or discussion is that it requires a technology interface. Get the technology right first.

  1. Use video. We forget how much connection comes from being in a room with other people. That’s why it’s essential to use your video. It’s not the same as in-person engagement but it’s a lot better than talking to a black screen. Now that you’re on video, consider the background. We all understand that people are working from home. This is not a normal situation. Even so, do what you can to ensure that the background is reasonably professional or, at a minimum, not filled with distractions.
  2. Make eye contact. If you were in-person, you’d make eye contact with the people in the room. Now, the screen is filled with little squares of people and some are black boxes with just a name or, worse, a phone number. But there is a way to make eye contact with each of them. Look into the camera. Your natural tendency is to look at the faces on the screen. Don’t. Instead, train yourself to look directly into the camera. For those on the other end, it will feel like you are talking specifically to them. Warning! This takes practice because it doesn’t feel natural. It’s worth the effort for audience connection.
  3. Have good lighting. It doesn’t do any good to have your video on and make eye contact through the camera if they can’t see you! Because I do a lot of webinars and virtual workshops I invested in an inexpensive light. (If you’re interested in that, I’m happy to share information about the one I bought.) A special light isn’t necessary if you take a little care. Backlighting is the biggest problem. It might be tempting to sit next to a window but the bright light from the window will render you too dark. Consider your location and use lamps to even out the light so your audience can see you. Most importantly, test it. See how you look on camera with your lighting and background.
  4. Have good sound. Depending on your needs, the speaker in your computer may be adequate. If not, there are external microphones that will enhance the sound quality considerably. After all, it won’t matter if you have great information if they can’t hear you, your voice is garbled or cutting in and out.
  5. Hardwire for reliability. Wi-Fi is great but for a webinar or any online program of importance, hardwiring your computer is the way to go.

After technology, the next significant difference with webinars is the challenge of keeping attention and engagement. You’ll want to redesign your presentation specifically as a webinar. Here’s what you need to do:

  1. Move slides often. Movement on the screen is like a shiny object for the brain of your audience. Use more movement in your slides than you would during an in-person briefing. By “movement” I don’t mean animation like bouncing, flipping or sparkling text. I advise using animation sparingly and only when it helps make your point. Consider doing more “build” slides where each point comes in as you discuss it. That’s more interesting for their brains than talking for 5 to 10 minutes about a single slide. That’s too long for your participants’ brains to stay engaged.  Images are another way to engage the brain. Use real photos (not clip art!) that illustrate your points in a vivid way. Visual images or visual language engages the vision center in the brain which helps embed memory.
  2. Simplify your slides. While it’s never a good practice to have numerous words on a slide, it’s even worse in a webinar. The screen size is small, and the distractions are big. PowerPoint (or other presentation media) are a visual Simplify your presentation with large fonts conveying key points only. You don’t have to write in complete sentences. Plus, if you only have keywords on the screen, their attention is on you. Instead of all that text, use photos instead. Oh…. did I mention photos already? I’ll say it again. Use photos instead of text.
  3. Get engagement immediately. Intentionally look for ways to engage the participants. Tell them upfront that you’ll be asking questions, encouraging “chat” and other forms of interaction. That makes them more attentive. They now have a job to do. Then, ask a compelling question immediately. Ask them about why your topic is of interest or relevant to them. This gets them thinking and they make their own case for why they care about your subject.
  4. Use other engagement tools. Depending on the webinar platform, there are other types of engagement tools you can use. Know them. Use them. It may be a poll, a raised hand, a yes/no button, or thumbs up/down button. Review your presentation or briefing and identify places where you can ask for a response in chat, insert a polling question, ask for raised hands or unmute for real-time discussion. Plan interaction throughout your presentation so that people are engaged, listening and learning.
  5. There’s a good chance we’ll see more webinars and remote programs even after COVID-19 issues scale back. Now’s the perfect time to up your game so that you are the person people are pleased to engage with online.

Shelley Row, P.E. explains why NOW is probably the best time for technical managers to work on improving their leadership skills (and earn PDH credits!).
Registration & more info -> https://ilinstitute.teachable.com/

Leave a Reply